Greenville

History

  • Indian Trading Post and Mill

The city of Greenville is situated on land formerly belonging to the Cherokee Indians and briefly used by an Indian trader, Richard Pearis, as his camp site. On this site Pearis built a house, a trading post, a smoke house, stables, a dairy, a blacksmith shop, a grist mill, a sawmill and slave quarters. Pearis also planted crops and an orchard. However, because he was not a Patriot, all of these possessions he lost during the Revolutionary War.

Following the defeat of the Cherokee Indians and the British during the Revolutionary War, South Carolina made available to Revolutionary soldiers for first occupancy all of the land which composes both the City of Greenville and the County of Greenville.

  • The Village

In 1797, having purchased the grant of land which included Pearis’ camp site and which later had been purchased from the State by Revolutionary soldier, Thomas Brandon, and having obtained several other tracts of adjacent land, totaling 11,023 acres, Lemuel Alston drew a plan for a Village with lots laid off and containing a court house and a jail. This little village which he had named Pleasantburg soon became known as “Greeneville” and was soon thereafter was spelled “Greenville.”

Lemuel Alston’s dream of development only partly came true. A log jail was built, a log courthouse was built, lots were laid off but only a few lots sold.

  • McBee Influence

In 1815, Alston sold all of his holdings and his very nice home, called Prospect Hill (pictured), to Vardry McBee of Lincolnton, North Carolina.

Through McBee’s progressive efforts, which included not only the sale of real estate, partnership with newcomers in new businesses, bringing trained tradesmen, such as harness and saddle makers, brick makers, a mill wright, carriage makers and house builders to the area, the village grew to a town.

In addition, McBee gave land to each denomination of religion on which to build their church.

After becoming a trading center for surrounding counties, in time, the little Town of Greenville also became a health resort for the low country people who were escaping the malaria and humidity of the coastal regions. Stagecoaches conveyed passengers and mail from Charleston and Asheville. Greenville’s first newspaper, The Republican, began to be published.

  • From Village to Town

In 1831, the Village of Greenville became the Town of Greenville and established a City Government with a Council made up of an Intendant and four Wardens. The Council appointed a Clerk, a High Constable, a Town Surveyor, a Bell Ringer and a Sexton who would care for the Town Cemetery, later to be named Springwood Cemetery. The Council strongly advocated the planting of trees along down town streets. To protect their trees, they voted to fine those citizens who even tied their horses to the trees while on business in downtown.

Of the many log and weather boarded houses built in the town before 1850, only a few remain and all are listed on the National Register of Historic Places – Whitehall, also referred to as Governor Middleton’s House; the Fountain Fox Beattie House, known as the Greenville Woman’s Club; the Elias Earle Town House and the Josiah Kilgore House (pictured), which is home to the Greenville Garden Club.

The 1850s were a time of rapid growth in the little town of Greenville and its immediate surrounding area. A new Court House was built and believed to have been designed by the well known Engineer/Architect Robert Mills. Both Furman University and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary came to town.

The first railroad, the Greenville and Columbia Railroad, built its terminal in the West End area. The Greenville Female College was established and grammar schools built. Greenville had a locally owned carriage and wagon manufacturing plant, the largest in the south. Through the generosity of a citizen, Alexander McBee, the City was provided with piped water.

Greenville ’s nearby mountains still provide an abundance of pure water and shield the City from severe weather, such as tornados and large amounts of frozen precipitation.

  • The 1860s and The Civil War

The City Council had the patrols to become better organized and to be under the direction of Marshals. Men were enlisted into military groups. Women’s groups organized to knit socks and gloves, to prepare bandages and to care for the sick and wounded.

Vardry McBee gave to the State of South Carolina a piece of land on which to build an Armory for the repair and manufacture of rifles, particularly Morse rifles, for the use of the Confederate Army. Morse, himself, moved to Greenville to oversee the rifle making.

At the close of the Civil War, Greenville’s own, Benjamin F. Perry, an attorney, was appointed provisional Governor of South Carolina. Federal troops, commanded by Major John W. DeForest occupied Greenville for the duration of the Reconstruction period.

  • From Town to City – The Textile Influence

In February 1869, Greenville’s Town Charter was amended by the S. C. General Assembly establishing Greenville, the town, as a City. Again, Greenville began to grow. An African American church, Springfield Baptist, was built, the Southern Railroad began operations through Greenville, a large cotton seed oil mill was built on Augusta Street, a horse drawn street railway began operations and the first real bridge was built for Main Street to cross the Reedy River.

Almost simultaneously, publication began of a daily paper, Greenville Daily News, and a large textile mill, Camperdown, was built on the river in downtown Greenville.

In 1876, Greenville’s first non-protestant church was built – St. Mary’s Catholic Church. 1882 was a memorable year for a second mill, the Huguenot Mill, was built within the City, telephone service was inaugurated, home mail delivery had begun and the City School District was created. By the 1890, a second City Hall had to be built along with a City Hospital.

In the late 1890s, Greenville hosted a U. S. Army training camp called Camp Wetherill where soldiers were trained to serve in the Spanish-American War.

With the turn of the century came electric street cars, Southern Bell telephone service, Coca-Cola and American Cigar production, the building of the Ottaray Hotel and a local man, Martin F. Ansel, being elected to serve as Governor of South Carolina.

In the mid teens, with Greenville being known as the “ Textile Center of the South”, an Exposition Hall for the textile industries was built, but WWII was soon in progress and another army camp was built. This time, the army camp called Camp Sevier was outside of the City, but had a great impact on the economy of the City.

  • New Residential Areas Evolve

With the increase in wealth because of textile manufacture and other industries coupled with the establishment of a streetcar system, new residential neighborhoods came into being, such as the Hampton-Pinckney neighborhood (pictured), the Pettigru Street neighborhood, the Pendleton Street neighborhood, the James and Earle Streets neighborhood and the Overbrook neighborhood.

  • Construction Boom

The mid-20s brought the Poinsett Hotel (“Carolina’s Finest”), the Chamber of Commerce building, South Carolina’s largest furniture store and a theater.

Then, along came textile mill strikes and the Great Depression which affected Greenville just as they did the rest of the country. Construction came to a halt for several years and it was not until World War II and the building of Donaldson Air Force base just south of the City of Greenville that the economy in Greenville improved.

In the mid 1970s, Heritage Green, a cultural complex made up of The Little Theatre, Greenville County Library, the Greenville County Museum of Art and the Greenville Symphony Association, opened in downtown Greenville.

As the suburbs of Greenville showed great increases in both housing and businesses, the heart of the City suffered a great decline. In the late 1970s, a Downtown Revitalization Project was launched. The Hyatt Regency and Commons Garage became an anchor to the effort which led to additional growth and benefits in the downtown area.

A public/private effort was launched in 1985 creating a performing arts center which became known as The Peace Center for the Performing Arts. The Peace Center opened in 1990 providing six acres of new and restored buildings including the Peace Center, the Gunter Theater, the former Coach Factory, the former textile plant known as Huguenot Mill, and the former mayonnaise factory known as Wyche Pavilion.

The 1990’s brought attention to the West End District which had become run down over time. The city of Greenville developed a restoration plan to turn two cotton warehouses at the corner of Augusta Street and Main Street into a market. For its efforts, the city of Greenville received the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s South Carolina Honor Award. The Greenville Memorial Auditorium, affectionately known as “the brown box,” was torn down in 1997 to make room for the Bi-Lo Center.

While the arts have always thrived in the community, art literally took to the streets during the 2000’s and became a vital part in the redevelopment of downtown Greenville. From the founding fathers located on Court Square and the students of Sterling High School standing proudly at Washington Street to the Mice on Main hiding up and down the street, art in public places became prominent at every corner of downtown.

With the welcome of a new millennium came the reopening of the Westin Poinsett Hotel which was brought back to life with the elegance it possessed when it first opened in 1925. Adding to the charm of downtown Greenville was the redevelopment of Falls Park on the Reedy and the construction of the Liberty Bridge which was dedicated in 2005. At a time when any other city would be content with its accomplishments, the City took on a monster challenge of building a baseball stadium in downtown Greenville modeled after Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox.

Development not only took place in the commercial areas of Greenville, but also in the residential areas. The era brought more opportunities for home ownership and residents accepted more responsibility for their neighborhoods creating additional residential and historical districts. Federal loans allowed for more community development and many residents who once lived in the suburbs returned to Main Street by restoring upper floors of old businesses into residential space.

At the end of 2000’s Heritage Green underwent a major makeover with the addition of the Hughes Main Library of the Greenville County Library System, the Upcountry History Museum, the Museum and Gallery at Heritage Green, and the Children’s Museum. While the economy of the late 2000’s has brought many cities to its knees, the city of Greenville has continued to grow and thrive,  bringing citizens and visitors back to the river where it all began many years ago.

Population Information:
Greenville County  379,616 (2000)

Avg Household Size:  2.47
Avg Family Size:  3.00
Median Household Income:  $41,149

School Information:

Area Elementary Schools

A.J. Whittenberg
Margaret Thomason
420 Westfield Street
Greenville, SC  29601
(864) 452-0500
Map and Directions
Alexander
Leda Young
1601 Bramlett Rd.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-1000
FAX: (864) 355-1044
School Profile
Map and Directions
Armstrong
Jackie Goggins
8601 White Horse Rd.
Greenville 29617
(864) 355-1100
FAX: (864) 355-1158
School Profile
Map and Directions
Augusta Circle
Kerry Bannister
100 Winyah Street
Greenville 29605
(864) 355-1200
FAX:(864) 355-1212
School Profile
Map and Directions

Bell’s Crossing
Barbara Barlow
804 Scuffletown Road
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-3800
FAX: (864) 355-3885
School Profile
Map and Directions
Berea
Thomas Miller
100 Berea Dr.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-1500
FAX: (864) 355-1558
School Profile
Map and Directions
Bethel
Brenda D. Byrd
111 Bethel School Rd.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-4100
FAX: (864) 355-4180
School Profile
Map and Directions
Blythe Academy
Sandra Griffin
100 Blythe Drive
Greenville, SC 29605
(864) 355-4400
FAX: (864) 355-4412
SchoolProfile
Map and Directions
Brook Glenn
Bernice Jackson
2003 East Lee Rd.
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-4700
FAX: (864) 355-4755
School Profile
Map and Directions
Brushy Creek
DeeDee Washington
1344 Brushy Creek Rd.
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-5400
FAX: (864) 355-5413
School Profile
Map and Directions
Bryson
Thomas Chambers
703 Bryson Dr.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-3600
FAX: (864) 355-3696
School Profile
Map and Directions

Buena Vista
Dr. Ann K. Mohr
310 Batesville Rd.
Greer 29651
(864) 355-2200
FAX: (864) 355-2214
School Profile
Map and Directions
Chandler Creek
Katherine Bayne
301 Chandler Rd.
Greer 29651
(864) 355-2400
FAX: (864) 355-2420
School Profile
Map and Directions

Cherrydale
Scarlet Black
302 Perry Rd.
Greenville 29609
(864) 355-3300
FAX: (864) 355-3361
School Profile
Map and Directions
Crestview
David Langston
509 American Legion Road
Greer 29651
(864) 355-2600
FAX: (864) 355-2613
School Profile
Map and Directions
Duncan Chapel
Regenia McClain
210 Duncan Chapel Rd.
Greenville 29617
(864) 355-2700
FAX: (864) 355-2769
School Profile
Map and Directions
East North St. Acad.
Nancy Brantley
1720 E. North St.
Greenville 29607
(864) 355-2900
FAX: (864) 355-2980
School Profile
Map and Directions

Ellen Woodside
Stephanie Reese
9122 Augusta Rd.
Pelzer 29669
(864) 355-4900
FAX: (864) 355-4965
School Profile
Map and Directions
Fork Shoals
Christopher David Ross
916 McKelvey Rd.
Pelzer 29669
(864) 355-5000
FAX: (864) 355-5012
School Profile
Map and Directions
Fountain Inn
Glenn Wile
608 Fairview St.
Fountain Inn 29644
(864) 355-5100
FAX: (864) 355-5164
School Profile
Map and Directions
Gateway
Susan Stubley
200 Hawkins Rd.
Travelers Rest 29690
(864) 355-5200
FAX: (864) 355-5259
School Profile
Map and Directions
Greenbrier
Nicky Andrews
853 Log Shoals Rd.
Greenville 29607
(864) 355-5300
FAX: (864) 355-5327
School Profile
Map and Directions
Grove
Deborah Bauer
1220 Old Grove Rd.
Piedmont 29673
(864) 355-5900
FAX: (864) 355-5965
School Profile
Map and Directions

Heritage
Martha Kinard
1592 Geer Highway
Travelers Rest 29690
(864) 355-6000
FAX: (864) 355-6046
School Profile
Map and Directions
Hollis Academy
Miki Golden, Jr.
200 Goodrich Street
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-4800
FAX: (864) 355-4826
School Profile
Map and Directions
Lake Forest
Cindy Coggins
16 Berkshire Avenue
Greenville 29615
(864) 355-4000
FAX: (864) 355-4072
School Profile
Map and Directions

Mauldin
Michael Parker
1194 Holland Road,
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-3700
FAX: (864) 355-3783
School Profile
Map and Directions
Mitchell Road
Nerissa Lewis
4124 E. North St. Ext.
Greenville 29615
(864) 355-6700
FAX: (864) 355-6719
School Profile
Map and Directions
Monaview
Sharon Dowell
10 Monaview St.
Greenville 29617
(864) 355-4300
FAX: (864) 355-4314
School Profile
Map and Directions
Mountain View
Tommy Hughes
6350 Hwy. 253
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-6800
FAX: (864) 355-6856
School Profile
Map and Directions
Oakview
Dr. Phillip Reavis
515 Godfrey Rd.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-7100
FAX: (864) 355-7115
School Profile
Map and Directions
Paris
David Wise
32 East Belvue Road
Taylors, SC 29687
(864) 355-4260
FAX: (864) 355-4391
School Profile
Map and Directions
Pelham Road
W. LaVelle McCray
100 All Star Way
Greenville 29615
(864) 355-7600
FAX: (864) 355-7658
School Profile
Map and Directions
Plain
Deborah Mihalic
506 Neely Ferry Road
Simpsonville  29680
(864) 355-7700
FAX: (864) 355-7774
School Profile
Map and Directions
Robert E. Cashion
Shirley Chapman
1500 Fork Shoals Road
Greenville, SC 29605
(864) 355-8000
FAX: (864) 355-8021
School Profile
Map and Directions
Rudolph Gordon
Jackie Parker
1507 Scuffletown Road
Simpsonville, SC 29681
(864) 452-0200
FAX: (864) 452-0242
School Profile
Map and Directions
Sara Collins
Alice Arrington
1200 Parkins Mill Road
Greenville, SC 29607
(864) 355-3200
FAX: (864) 355-3290
School Profile
Map and Directions
Simpsonville
Jan James
200 Morton Avenue
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-8300
FAX:(864) 355-8360
School Profile
Map and Directions
Skyland
Carolyn Styles
4221 Hwy. 14 North
Greer 29651
(864) 355-7200
FAX: (864) 355-7215
School Profile
Map and Directions
Slater-Marietta
Lindsey D. Cole, III
100 Bakers Circle
Marietta, SC 29661
(864) 355-2000
FAX: (864) 355-2016
School Profile
Map and Directions
Sterling School
Charles Townes Gifted Center

David Johnstone
99 John McCarroll Way
Greenville, SC  29607
864-355-4480
School Profile
Map and Directions
Stone Academy
Edward Holliday
115 Randall St
Greenville 29609
(864) 355-8400
FAX: (864) 355-8455
School Profile
Map and Directions
Sue Cleveland
Karen Chambers
375 Woodmont School Road
Piedmont 29673
(864) 355-4200
FAX: (864) 355-4215
School Profile
Map and Directions
Summit Drive
Dr. Megan Mitchell-Hoefer
424 Summit Dr.
Greenville 29609
(864) 355-8800
FAX: (864) 355-8817
School Profile
Map and Directions
Taylors
Vaughan Overman
809 Reid School Rd.
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-7450
FAX: (864) 355-7477
School Profile
Map and Directions
Thomas E. Kerns
Judy Mulkey
6650 Frontage at White Horse Rd
Greenville 29605-3300
(864) 355-1300
FAX: (864) 355-1351
School Profile
Map and Directions
Tigerville
Regina Urueta
25 Tigerville Elem. School Rd.
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-4600
FAX: (864) 355-4646
School Profile
Map and Directions
Welcome
Christine Philips
36 E. Welcome Rd.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-3900
FAX: (864) 355-3961
School Profile
Map and Directions
Westcliffe
Carolyn Morgan
105 Eastbourne Rd.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-0300
FAX: (864) 355-0360
School Profile
Map and Directions
    Woodland
Wanda Mote
1730 Gibbs Shoals Road,
Greer 29650
(864) 355-0400
FAX: (864) 355-0477
School Profile
Map and Directions

Area Middle Schools

Beck Academy
Jason Warren
901 Woodruff Road
Greenville 29607
(864) 355-1400
FAX: (864) 355-1490
School Profile
Map and Directions
Berea
Robin Mill
151 Berea Middle School Rd.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-1700
FAX: (864) 355-1777
School Profile
Map and Directions
Blue Ridge
Rebecca R. Greene
2423 E. Tyger Bridge Rd.
Greer 29651
(864) 355-1900
FAX: (864) 355-1966
School Profile
Map and Directions
Bryson
Phillip Davie
3657 South Industrial Dr.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-2100
School Profile
Map and Directions
Greenville Academy
Dr. Robert Palmer
339 Lowndes Avenue
Greenville, SC 29607
(864) 355-5600
FAX: (864) 355-5682
School Profile
Map and Directions
Greer
Scott Rhymer
3032 E. Gap Creek Rd.
Greer 29651
(864) 355-5800
FAX: (864) 355-5880
School Profile
Map and Directions
Hillcrest
Keith Russell
510 Garrison Rd.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-6100
FAX: (864) 355-6120
School Profile
Map and Directions
Hughes Academy
Dr. Patrick J. Mark
122 DeOyley Ave.
Greenville 29605
(864) 355-6200
FAX: (864) 355-6275
School Profile
Map and Directions
Lakeview
Dr. Tracy Hall
3801 Old Buncombe Road
Greenville 29617
(864) 355-6400
FAX: (864) 355-6416
School Profile
Map and Directions
League Academy
Merry Cox
125 Twin Lake Dr.
Greenville 29609
(864) 355-8100
FAX: (864) 355-8160
School Profile
Map and Directions
Mauldin
Rosia Gardner
1190 Holland Rd.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-6770
FAX: (864) 355-6988
School Profile
Map and Directions
Northwest
Lee Givins
1606 Geer Hwy.
Travelers Rest 29690
(864) 355-6900
FAX: (864) 355-6920
School Profile
Map and Directions
Northwood
Richard Griffin
710 Ike’s Rd.
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-7000
FAX: (864) 355-7077
School Profile
Map and Directions
Ralph Chandler
Rita Mantooth
4231 Fork Shoals Road
Simpsonville, SC 29680
(864) 452-0300
FAX: (864) 452-0365
School Profile
Map and Directions
Riverside
Ron Harrison
615 Hammett Bridge Rd.
Greer 29650
(864) 355-7900
FAX: (864) 355-7918
School Profile
Map and Directions
Sevier
Karen Kapp
1000 Piedmont Park Road
Greenville 29609
(864) 355-8200
FAX: (864) 355-8255
School Profile
Map and Directions

Sterling School
Charles Townes Gifted Center

David Johnstone
99 John McCarroll Way
Greenville, SC  29607
864-355-4480
School Profile
Map and Directions
  Tanglewood
William Price
44 Merriwoods Dr.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-4500
FAX: (864) 355-4512
School Profile
Map and Directions
Woodmont
Gregg Scott
325 North Flat Rock Road
Piedmont 29673
(864) 355-8500
FAX: (864) 355-8587
School Profile
Map and Directions

Area High Schools

Berea
Mike Noel – Interim
201 Burdine Drive
Greenville 29617
(864) 355-1600
FAX: (864) 355-1625
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Blue Ridge
Reena Watson
2151 Fews Chapel Rd.
Greer 29651
(864) 355-1800
FAX: (864) 355-1821
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Carolina Academy
Anthony Holland
2725 Anderson Rd.
Greenville 29611
(864) 355-2300
FAX: (864) 355-2375
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Eastside
Mike Thorne
1300 Brushy Creek Rd.
Taylors 29687
(864) 355-2800
FAX: (864) 355-2992
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Greenville High Academy
JF Dalton Lucas, Jr.
1 Vardry St.
Greenville 29601
(864) 355-5500
FAX: (864) 355-5492
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Greer
Marion Waters
3000 East Gap Creek Dr.
Greer 29651
(864) 355-5700
FAX: (864) 355-5725
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Hillcrest
Steve Chamness
3665 S. Industrial Dr.
Simpsonville 29681
(864) 355-3500
FAX: (864) 355-3382
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
J.L. Mann Academy
Charles S. Mayfield
160 Fairforest Way
Greenville 29607
(864) 355-6300
FAX: (864) 355-6329
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Mauldin
Ann Miller
701 E. Butler Rd.
Mauldin 29662
(864) 355-6500
FAX: (864) 355-6657
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Riverside
Andrew Crowley
794 Hammett Bridge Road
Greer 29650
(864) 355-7800
FAX: (864) 355-7898
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Southside
Carlos Brooks
6630 Frontage at White Horse Rd
Greenville 29605-3300
(864) 355-8700
FAX: (864) 355-8798
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Travelers Rest
Louis E. Lavely, Jr.
301 North Main St.
Travelers Rest 29690
(864) 355-0000
FAX: (864) 355-0088
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions
Wade Hampton
Lance Radford
100 Pine Knoll Dr.
Greenville 29609
(864) 355-0100
FAX: (864) 355-0194
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions

Woodmont
Darryl Imperati
2831 West Georgia Road
Piedmont 29673
(864) 355-8600
FAX: (864) 355-8695
School Profile
Map and Driving Directions

Utility Information:

Power Water
Duke Power — (800) 777-9898

Laurens Electric — (800) 942-3141

Greenville Water Sys. — (864) 241-6000
   
Telephone & Internet  
AT&T — (800) 336-0014

Charter Comm. — (888) 438-2427

 
   
Television (Cable/Satellite) Natural Gas
Charter Comm. — (888) 438-2427

DirecTV — (888) 777-2454

DISH Network — (800) 823-4929

Piedmont Natural Gas — (800) 752-7504